Jun 16, 2014

Big 5 Glossary: Facebook, Google Plus, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest


There are a lot of social networks out there today, but the “big 5″ are definitely the ones you hear about the most.

Below you will find a glossary of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Google+ terms.

Facebook

Profile – A personal page created for individual use.

Page – This is your business profile or “page” where customers can find your posts and business information.

Page “Like” – When a fan “likes” your page, anything you post or update will show up in their news feed.

Activity Log – A log that shows you all of your scheduled content, as well as past content posted to your page.

Insights – This is your analytics hub. You can find all post and page analytics here.

Reach – The number of people who saw your post. This includes the number of people you reached through organic and paid reach.

Organic Reach – The number of people who saw your post.

Paid Reach – The number of people who saw your post due to an ad you paid for.

Engagement – The number of likes, comments, and shares you receive.

Post Clicks – The number of people who clicked on anything in your post. This could include someone clicking on an image with a “see more” call to action or a URL you included.

Post – A term used for sharing content on your Facebook Page.

Text-Only Posts – A post without an image, video, or link.

Multimedia – A post that includes an image or video.

Link – A post that includes a URL.

News Feed – Your news feed is the first thing you see when you log in to Facebook. The feed shows new posts from pages and profiles you’ve “liked.”

Timeline – The stream of updates on your own personal profile or page.

Profile Picture – The image that represents you or your business. This is the smaller photo that shows up alongside all of your posts.

Cover Photo – The 851×315 pixel image found at the top of your page or profile.

“Like” – An engagement function that lets fans give positive feedback on a post.

Comment – This one is self explanatory!

Share – The share feature lets you share the content you enjoy with personal Facebook friends.

Message – A private message.

Chat – An instant messenger.

Tab – These are found underneath your cover photo and include the number of friends/fans, photos, and third-party apps you have.

Events – Facebook Events can be created by a page or profile, and are used for parties, business events, and planned chats.

Group – This can be public or private, and gives users the chance to come together to talk about a specific subject in one place.

Friends – A friend is someone who received your friend request and accepted it. Once the request is accepted, you will start seeing their updates in your news feed.

Fans – These are the people who “liked” your business page. A business does not have to take any action for someone to become a fan.

Sponsored Story – This is a message that comes from a friend about them engaging with a page, app, or event that a business, organization, or individual has paid to highlight.

Promoted Post or “Boost” – You can pay to boost a specific post so that it is shown to more friends or fans.

Display Ad – An ad you create that is shown on the right-hand side of Facebook along with other ads.

Twitter

Tweet – The content you share with your followers.

Handle – This is your “username” on Twitter that appears with an “@” symbol in front of it.

Hashtags – Although they were originally created and supported by Twitter, hashtags are now utilized on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Vine, Google+, and Tumblr. A hashtag is a group of words or phrases (with no spaces), preceded by a # sign (i.e. #ONECON or #CCPin). It is used to tie various social media posts together and relate them to a topic. Topics are sometimes connected to an event, TV show, sporting event, or any happening or trend etc.

Reply – You can reply directly to a tweet. Only the people following you and the person you’re replying to can see your reply (unless you place a character before the handle at the beginning of the tweet).

Retweet – A way to repost or share someone else’s tweet.

Favorite – This functions just as a Facebook “like” does. You can also use this as a saving tool and go back to your favorites later.

Mention – The act of including someone’s handle in your tweet. That person will then get a notification that they’ve been mentioned.

Direct Message – This is the only way to talk to someone on Twitter privately. You can create these by either starting your tweet with “DM” or going to someone’s profile and using the “message” function.

Feed – This is the first thing you see when you log in to Twitter. New posts from your followers are placed in your feed.

Followers – These are the people who have followed your handle and can see your updates in their feed. You do not have to follow them in order for them to become your follower.

Following – These are the people you follow so you can see their updates in your feed. They do not have to follow you for you to be able to follow them.

Trends – The most commonly used hashtags at that present time are considered trends. They can also be made to pull from a specific location.

Lists – Groupings of your followers that you’ve created and categorized so that you can find them easily.

Connect – A tab where all mentions, replies, retweets, and favorites can be found.

Discover – A tab to search for hashtags, handles, and keywords.

Verified Account – This is used to establish authentic handles of key or public individuals and brands.

LinkedIn

Update – Status updates and content that you post.

Profile – Similar to a resume, you add information about you and your job history.

Company Page – A place for businesses to include information about their business and create updates about their business and their industry.

Mention – Just like Facebook and Twitter, you can mention others in your LinkedIn updates.

Connection – An indicator that you and a person are connected to each other.

Degrees – This acts like 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon by showing you how you are connected to a person even if it’s through a number of people.

Invitation – Invite someone to join your network and connect with you.

Introduction – A way to introduce yourself to those you are not currently connected to.

Groups – These can be public or private, and can be created by an individual or company. It allows users to come together and talk about a specific subject on one page.

Network – Your connections which also includes the connections of your connections.

Recommendation – A way to recommend a friend/colleague, based on their professional experience, to anyone who views their profile.

Influencers – Key and influential people in your industry that can provide you with great content.

LinkedIn Today – A source for all of your industry news in one place.

Pinterest

Pins – An image uploaded (“pinned”) from any webpage or your own computer to a Pinterest board. All pins link back to their original source, so make sure you choose the right webpage.

Pinner – The person behind the pins.

Repin – The act of sharing someone else’s pin.

“Like” – This functions just as a Facebook “like” or a Twitter “Favorite” does. It tells the pinner you enjoyed what they pinned.

Board – A grouping of pins under a category you’ve created. It allows you to organize your thoughts, images, and websites.

Mention – Just like on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, you can mention another pinner in a post. They will also get a notification about the pin.

Follow – The act of following other pinners or just a couple of their boards. They do not have to follow you back for you to be able to follow them.

Google+

Profile – This is the landing page that displays your profile picture, the information you’ve provided, and the content you’ve posted to Google Plus.

Page – Similar to a profile, a Google Plus Page is created by a business or a brand.

+1 Button – This functions as a Facebook “like” button does. The +1 button allows users to indicate they appreciated your content.

Share – This button, which looks like an arrow, allows others to share your content on their Google Plus Streams.

Comment – This one’s easy…people can comment on your content! :)

Tag – When mentioning an individual or business in your Google Plus content, make sure to tag them. When you do, they get a notification that you have mentioned them. This feature operates like it does on Facebook, so before typing the person or businesses name, include the “@” symbol. This will produce a drop-down box that will change based on the letters you type. Find the person you are trying to tag and click on their name.

Google Plus Streams – This is your view when you log in to Google Plus. It shows the stream of content posted from others in your circles.

Circles – These are the categories you create to organize your followers and the people you follow. These categories can be anything you’d like them to be, but the most common examples include “Family,” “Friends,” “Work,” “Local Businesses” etc. When posting content, you can choose to expose your content to the public, your Circles, or Extended Circles.

Extended Circles – These are tricky because just like Facebook’s algorithm, we’re not quite sure how Google decides who to show your extended content to. Essentially, by sharing your content with your Extended Circles, your “friends of friends” MAY see your content.

Local – This one is huge for you and your business because 97 percent of consumers search for local businesses online. This means that your business information needs to be readily available to all search engines. A Local Google Plus Page allows your customers to find your hours, address, and phone number all in one place. This information is displayed within a Google Search, so you want to make sure your information is accurate and up to date.

Hangout – A Hangout is a video chat with up to 10 people at one time.

Hangout on Air (HOA) – This is a Google Hangout that is “broadcasted” (on air), and can be watched both live on your Google Plus Page or after the Hangout. The finished product can be found on both your Google Plus Page as well as your YouTube page, which makes Hangout’s on Air a perfect content marketing platform for customer promotions via social media, email, and website.

Communities – Google Plus Communities are created by brands or individuals to encourage conversations and share information around one specific topic or service.

Google Plus Bar (or Sand Bar) – The Google Plus Bar is the gray bar that lives at the top of any Google property with your image and a drop-down arrow. This function allows you to share content from other Google properties to your Google Plus Page quickly.

Source: Constantcontact

Google Analytics Glossary


Google Analytics is a free Web analytics program that provides data and information about Website traffic and efficiency. Without an understanding of the terms and tools within the program, it is hard to make the most of Google Analytics. The program uses many terms that are difficult to understand if you are not immersed in Web analytics. E-Power Marketing has put together a Google Analytics Glossary of Terms that will help you understand your Google Analytics system. The more comfortable you are with the program, and the better you understand the terminology, the more efficiently you can use Google Analytics to improve the performance of your Website.

A

Alerts: A Google Analytics Alert is a notification of a change in your data. Alerts are beneficial because they draw your attention to program abnormalities you otherwise may have overlooked.

B

Benchmarking: The Google Analytics service gives users a view into how their Website is performing in comparison to other Websites of similar size. Benchmarking allows you to compare your site's Analytics data, including visits, page views, bounce rate, average time on site and other metrics against data from other participating Websites.

Bounce Rate: The percentage of visits in which the visitor only views one page of your Website before leaving is known as the Bounce Rate. With Bounce Rate information, you can analyze the quality of user visits. A high Bounce Rate often indicates that your pages are not relevant to what your visitors are looking for. You can lower your bounce rate by generating better targeted ads and Landing Pages, as well as creating quality content that will engage visitors and draw them into your Website.

C

Click: The single instance of a user following a hyperlink to another page or to initiate an action.

Conversion: This is what occurs when a goal is completed. Conversions happen when a visitor comes to your site and completes a desired goal or action. Completing a purchase and submitting a contact form are both examples of goals. Google Analytics allows you to create customized goals so you can measure user actions that are important to your Website.

Cookie: A small amount of text data used to remember information from page to page and visit to visit. Cookies can contain information such as user preferences or shopping cart contents.

Cost Data: The information imported from a Google AdWords account into an Analytics account.

Custom Reporting: Google Analytics offers the option to create custom reports based on the metrics and dimensions you choose. Custom reports present the information you selected, organized in a way that works for you. Once you create a custom report, it will be available to you each time you login.

D

Direct Traffic: Visits to your site where the user types your URL into their browser's address bar or when a visitor uses a bookmark to get to your Website. It is important to know where your Website traffic is coming from so you can understand which marketing endeavors are working for you. Direct traffic illustrates how many of your visitors know your brand and Website URL. These visitors did not find your Website on search engines or on another site. They came directly to your Website.

E

Ecommerce: The purchasing or selling of products or services over the Internet.

Exact Match: One of the three different match types that Google Analytics defines to identify a URL for either a goal or a funnel. An exact match is a match on every character in your search string from beginning to end.

Example: if you set your exact match URI to "/page1" then only the "/page1" string will be included. "/page12345" would not and "2/page1" would also not be included.

F

Filter: A guideline that includes or excludes specific data from reports. You can use filters to carry out actions like eliminating internal traffic from reports or to only include traffic to a specific subdomain. Learn more about using filters in Google Analytics.

Funnels: Series of steps a visitor completes to reach an end goal. Google Analytics allows you to indicate up to ten pages in each funnel definition. Creating funnels can show you where visitors abandon the process during the path to conversion.

G

Goal: A measure of something you want to track in Google Analytics that you define as a success. Goals must relate to a quantifiable action that your Website's visitors take, such as product purchases, newsletter sign ups, or downloads. Goals are set up in Google Analytics to track conversions.

Goal Conversion Rate: The percentage of visits on a site where the visitor completes a goal or completes a conversion.

Google Analytics: Free service offering a simple way to track metrics on your Website with the addition of a small snippet of code placed on all pages of your Website. Google Analytics allows you to see how visitors found your site, what pages they visited, how long they stayed on your site, among many other facts and figures. Properly understanding and interpreting the data available through Google Analytics will allow you to improve your Website, increase your conversions and increase your Website's effectiveness. You can create or access your Google Analytics account at http://www.google.com/analytics/.

H

Head Match: One of the three different match types that Google Analytics defines to identify a URL for either a goal or a funnel. Matches the characters you specify as the beginning of a string including all strings that end with characters in addition to what you have specified.

Example: if you set your head match URI to be "/page1", then "/page12345" will also be included because the beginning of the string is identical.

I

Impression: The display of a referral link or advertisement on a web page.

Include: A type of filter that matches a text string or regular expression against incoming data, and keeps only those hits that match.

K

Keywords: These are the words that visitors use to find your Website when using a search engine. Google Analytics provides a list of keywords that have been searched by users who find your Website. This information shows you what searchers are actually looking for when they find your Website. This also allows you to discover potential new keywords to target.

L

Landing Page: The first page a visitor views during a session; also known as the entrance page.

Loyalty: A measure of visitor behavior. A visitor's loyalty is illustrated by the amount of times they return to your Website in a specified time period. Loyal visitors are typically highly engaged with your Website and your brand. Low customer loyalty often illustrates the need for new content and regular updates to a Website.

M

Match Type: Defines how Google Analytics identifies a URL to include or exclude for goals and funnels. The three available match types include head match, exact match and regular expression match.

N

New Visitors: Internet users who have not previously or recently visited your site are considered new visitors. If cookies on a previous visitor's computer have expired or if they have deleted their cookies, these visitors will also register as new visitors. Google Analytics lets you see how many new visitors you have so you can fine-tune your Website to increase repeat visits as well as increase the number of new visitors.

O

Organic Traffic: Visitors who come to your Website from unpaid organic or natural search engine results.

P

Paid Traffic: This consists of visitors who come to your Website from Google AdWords ads, paid search engine keywords and other online paid ad campaigns. When investing in an online PPC or other advertising campaign, this data will show you how effective your paid online marketing program is.

Page View: The amount of times visitors arrive on individual pages of your Website. If a user reloads a page, that action will be counted as an additional page view. If a visitor navigates to a different page and then returns to the original page, a second Page View will be recorded as well. Page views allow you to see which pages on your site are the most popular.

Q

Query Parameter: A VARIABLE=VALUE pair that follows the question mark ("?") in a URL. Example: http://www.example.com/search?q=foo contains the query parameter q=foo

Query Variable: The VARIABLE portion of the VARIABLE=VALUE pair that makes up a query parameter. Variables store information such as search terms entered into a search engine. In the above example, the "q" in "q=foo" is the query variable.

R

Referring Sites: Other Websites that refer or send visitors to your Website are called referring sites. Knowing where your traffic is coming from is an easy way to increase your ROI. You can focus more resources on sites that are referring more traffic, or re-evaluate your campaigns on sites that are not driving much traffic.

Regular Expression Match: One of three different match types that Google Analytics defines to identify a URL for either a goal or a funnel. Special characters can be used that enable wildcard and flexible matching. This is useful if your visitors are coming from multiple sub domains or if you use dynamic session IDs.

Request URI: The string at the end of a URL after the ".com" in your Web address is the request URI.

Example: If your URL is "www.mycompany.com/page1/product1.htm" then your request URI is "/page/product1.htm".

Returning Visitor: A returning visitor is a user who has been to your Website and has come back. When visitors return to a Website, it demonstrates that the Website is of interest to them.

S

Search Engines: Online tools that allow you to find specific Web pages by using a keyword search query. The three main search engines are Google, Yahoo, and Bing. Google Analytics segments your traffic data so you can see which search engines are driving traffic to your Website, and how much traffic each search engine is generating. Google Analytics allows you to separate this data into paid and non-paid results.

T

Time on Site: The average length of time a visitor spends accessing your site within a specified time period. You can use this data to measure the effectiveness and quality of your Website. The longer visitors spend on your site, the more informative and interactive your site is.

Top Exit Pages: The pages on your Website that visitors leave from. In Google Analytics, these pages are listed in order from those the most visitors exited your site to those pages that visitors least exited your site. Take into consideration the content of the exit page when deciding on a course of action. If people are leaving your site from a Thank You page, there is no need for worry. If one of your Top Exit Pages is another page on your site, you want to investigate why your visitors are leaving from this page.

Top Landing Pages: The first pages that users land on, or come to when entering your Website. Within Google Analytics, these pages are listed in order of most visited to least visited. This data is important because it allows you to see which pages are attracting visitors.

Tracking Code: A small snippet of code that is inserted into the body of an HTML page. The tracking code captures information about visits to a page.

Traffic: The total number of visits to your Website. Within Google Analytics, traffic can be divided into multiple categories including, direct, organic and paid.

Traffic Sources: Where your traffic is coming from. Google Analytics includes information on which sites your visitors are coming to your Website from as well as what keywords they are using to get to your Website.

U

Unique Visitor: The number of individual (non-duplicate) visitors to a site over the course of a specific time period. This data is determined by cookies that are stored in visitor browsers.

Uniform Resource Locator (URL): The address of your Website (i.e. www.mycompany.com)

V

Visitor: The person who goes to a Website. The "Visitor" section of Google Analytics offers data and reports concerning the behavior of the visitors that frequent your Website.

Visitor Session: The time a visitor spends on a Website. The longer a visitor stays on your Website, the more relevant it appears to search engines. To increase the amount of time visitors stay on your site, it is important to present informative content, easy to use navigation, and up to date information on your brand, products and services.

Visits: The amount of times your Website is accessed. This data allows you to see how effectively your Website is being promoted. Watching the trends in your visits allows you to analyze which aspects of your online marketing are working.

Source: Epower

Jun 14, 2014

Top 25 Social Media Terms You Need To Know


The long lists of vocabulary continue to grow! Take a deep breath and know the basics (120 Social Media Marketing Terms).  

Here are the top 25 social media terms you need to know:

1. Viral: Anything shared across social networks that get passed along rapidly. YouTube videos are a great example.

2. Platform: A system that manages content. For instance, Wordpress is a platform that manages a community of blogs.

3. Authenticity: Used to describe "real" people behind blog posts and other social profiles.

4. Influence: An individual's importance online is now measured by the Klout Score, a measurement of online influence.

5. B2B: Business to Business.  

6. B2C: Business to Consumer.

7. Hashtag: HubSpot defines a hashtag as a "word or string of characters that starts with a number sign." Identical hashtags are then grouped into a search thread.

8. Search Engine Optimization (SEO): The process of organizing your website to give it the best chance of appearing near the top of search engine rankings.

9. Transparency: Social media users expect to engage in considerate online conversations with individuals and businesses. We all aspire to be transparent, but are we?

10. Web 2.0: Refers to the second generation of the Web which means people now blog and create websites without needing specialized technical knowledge and training.

11. Synergy: Dare we simply say teamwork between companies online?

12. Trending: A word, phrase or topic that is popular on Twitter at a given moment.

13. e-Book: A book published in digital form.

14. Wiki: Simple web pages that can be edited by other users.

15. Blog: A site updated frequently by an individual or group to record opinions or information.

16. User-Generated-Content (UGC): An article describes UGC as being Latin for “crap” which is, quite frankly, well-put. UGC is anything published online by the Average Joe.

17. Tweeps: Twitter + People = Tweople.

18. Microblogging: Short message postings from a social media account. Facebook statuses and Twitter posts are two examples.

19. Algorithm: An "algo" is a system that suggests pages to search engines in response to a search query.

20. Widget: A widget is a small, attractive applications on a website such as a hit counter. Gizmos can make good link bait. Speaking of link bait...

21. Link bait: Designed to attract incoming links. News and widget hooks are good examples.

22. Meme: A means of taking viral concepts and making them everyday lingo. Check out "Know Your Meme."

23. Engage: If you are communicating to other social media users, you are engaging.

24. Traffic: Traffic, traffic, traffic. This refers to the visitors that visit a website and it's all we talk about these days. A bit of advice: You must decide if traffic to your site is really that important to your organization, or if engaging with a loyal customer matters more.

25. Tag: Indicates or labels what content is about.

Source: SocialMediaToday

120 Social Media Marketing Terms

A

AddThis - AddThis is a social bookmarking service that provides a code users can put on their websites so that when people visit that site, they have the option to share via Facebook, Twitter, etc. Its analytics service can show you which pages are trending, where people are interacting with your brand, and what they're saying about your content on Twitter.

Algorithm - An algorithm is a set of formulas developed for a computer to perform a certain function. This is important in the social sphere as the algorithms sites like Facebook and Google use are critical for developing content-sharing strategies.

Application Programing Interface (API) - An API is a documented interface that allows one software application to interact with another application. An example of this is the Twitter API.

Avatar - An avatar is an image or username that represents a person online within forums and social networks.

B

BackType - BackType is a social media analytics company that helps companies measure their social engagement. Previously, the service started as a blog comment search engine.

Bitly - Bitly is a free URL shortening service that provides statistics for the links users share online. Bitly is popularly used to condense long URLs to make them easier to share on social networks such as Twitter.

Blip.TV - Blip.TV is an online video sharing site that provides a free and paid platform for individuals and companies who host an online video show.

Blog - Blog is a word that was created from two words: “web log.” Blogs are usually maintained by an individual or a business with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse-chronological order. "Blog" can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.

Blogger - Blogger is a free blogging platform owned by Google that allows individuals and companies to host and publish a blog typically on a subdomain. Example: yourblogname.blogspot.com

Blog Talk Radio - Blog Talk Radio is a free web application that allows users to host live online radio shows.

BoardReader - BoardReader is a free search engine that allows users to search for keywords only in posts and titles of online forums, a popular form of social networking.

Boxee - Boxee is a social video application that allows users to watch online videos on their TVs and computers. Users can share and watch videos from a variety of online videos sources for free.

Bookmarking - Bookmarking online follows the same idea of placing a bookmark in a physical publication--you're simply marking something you found important, enjoyed, or where you left off to continue reading later. The only difference online is that it's happening through websites using one of the various bookmarking services available, such as Delicious.

C

Chat - Chat can refer to any kind of communication over the internet but traditionally refers to one-to-one communication through a text-based chat application commonly referred to as instant messaging applications.

Circles - Circles are clusters of a user's friends on Google+, meaning you can group certain people you choose to connect with on your Google+ into a certain Circle--such as colleagues, college connections, family, etc. When you want to share content with only these individuals, you include that specific Circle in your post's sharing options.

Collecta - Collecta is a real-time search engine that includes results from blogs, microblogs, news feeds, and photo sharing services as they are published.

Collective Intelligence - Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence that emerges from the collaboration and competition of many individuals and appears in consensus decision-making in social networks.

Comment - A comment is a response that is often provided as an answer or reaction to a blog post or message on a social network. Comments are a primary form of two-way communication on the social web.

Compete - Compete is a web-based application that offers users and businesses web analytics and enables people to compare and contrast the statistics for different websites over time.

Connections - The LinkedIn equivalent of a Facebook 'friend' is a 'connection.' Because LinkedIn is a social networking site, the people you are connecting with are not necessarily people you are friends with, but rather you met in brief, heard speak, or know through another connection.

Craigslist - Craigslist is a popular online commerce site in which users sell a variety of goods and services to other users. The service has been credited for causing the reduction of classified advertising in newspapers across the United States.

Creative Commons - Creative Commons is a nonprofit corporation dedicated to making it easier for people to share and build upon the work of others, consistent with the rules of copyright. It provides free licenses and other legal tools to mark creative work with the freedom the creator wants it to carry, so others can share, remix, use commercially, or any combination thereof.

D

Delicious - Delicious is a free online bookmarking service that lets users save website addresses publicly and privately online so they can be accessed from any device connected to the internet and shared with friends.

Digg - Digg is a social news website that allows members to submit and vote for articles. Articles with the most votes appear on the homepage of the site and subsequently are seen by the largest portion of the site’s membership, as well as other visitors.

Disqus - Disqus is a comment system and moderation tool for your site. This service lets you add next-gen community management and social web integration to any site on any platform.

E

Ebook - An ebook is an electronic version of a printed book. However, most ebooks are not actually available in print (unless you print them). These are typically published in PDF form.

Eventbrite - Eventbrite is a provider of online event management and ticketing services. Eventbrite is free if your event is free. If you sell tickets to your event, Eventbrite collects a fee per ticket.

F

Facebook - Facebook is a social utility that connects people with friends and others who work, study, and live around them. Facebook is the largest social network in the world with more than 800 million users.

Firefox - Firefox is an open-source web browser. It has emerged as one of the most popular web browsers on the internet and allows users to customize their browser through the use of third-party extensions.

Flash Mob - A flash mob is a large group of people who assemble suddenly in a public place, perform an unusual and pointless act for a brief time, then quickly disperse. The term flash mob is generally applied only to gatherings organized via telecommunications, social media, or viral emails.

Flickr - Flickr is a social network based around online picture sharing. The service allows users to store photos online and then share them with others through profiles, groups, sets, and other methods.

Forums - Also known as a message board, a forum is an online discussion site. It originated as the modern equivalent of a traditional bulletin board, and a technological evolution of the dialup bulletin board system.

Follow Friday (#ff) - Follow friday is a trend via the hashtag #ff every Friday on Twitter. Users select other usernames and tweet them with #ff in their post, meaning they recommend following those Twitter users. People tweet at their favorite brands, colleagues, celebrities--you name it!

Foursquare - Foursquare is a social network in which friends share their locations and connect with others in close physical proximity to each other. The service uses a system of digital badges to reward players who “check in” to different types of locations.

Friends - No, not your pals you play poker with on the weekends. We're talking Facebook friends. These are individuals you consider to be friendly enough with you to see your Facebook profile and engage with you.

G

Google Chrome - Google Chrome is a free web browser produced by Google that fully integrates into its online search system as well as other applications.

Google Documents - Google Documents is a group of web-based office applications that includes tools for word processing, presentations, and spreadsheet analysis. All documents are stored and edited online and allow multiple people to collaborate on a document in real-time.

Google+ - Google+ is Google's new social network. It differs in that it promotes social sharing that is more similar to how people share in real life by providing features such as one that limits who you are talking to, creating 1-on-1 conversation.

Google Reader - Google Reader is an RSS reader that allows you to aggregate various blogs and sites and collect updates to new content in one location. You can log on whenever you choose, and the latest content from multiple blogs will be in one stream so you don't have to navigate to each site individually.

Gowalla - Gowalla is a social network in which friends share their locations and connect with others in close psychical proximity to each other.

Groundswell - A social trend in which people use technologies to get the things they need from each other, rather than from traditional institutions like corporations. (Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff, Groundswell, pg. 9)

H

Hangout - A Hangout is a video service on Google+ that allows you to video chat with up to 10 Google+ users are a time. You can name these chats, watch YouTube videos during them, open a Google Doc with colleagues, and much more.

Hashtag - A hashtag is a tag used on the social network Twitter as a way to annotate a message. A hashtag is a word or phrase preceded by a “#.” Example: #yourhashtag. Hashtags are commonly used to show that a tweet, a Twitter message, is related to an event or conference, online or offline.

hi5 - hi5 is a social network focused on the youth market. It is a social entertainment destination, with a focus on delivering a fun and entertainment-driven social experience online to users around the world.

HootSuite - HootSuite is a social media management system that helps brands streamline campaigns across social networks such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+ Pages. Teams can collaboratively monitor, engage, and measure the results of social campaigns from one secure, web-based dashboard.

HTML - HyperText Markup Language (HTML) is a programing language for web pages. Think of HTML as the brick-and-mortar of pages on the web. It provides content and structure while CSS supplies style. HTML has changed over the years, and it is on the cusp of its next version: HTML5.

I

Inbound Marketing - Inbound marketing is a style of marketing that essentially focuses permission-based marketing techniques that businesses can use to get found by potential customers, convert those prospects into leads and customers, and analyze the process along the way. Inbound marketing leverages tactics such as SEO, blogging, social media, lead generation, email marketing, lead nurturing, and analytics. It is in direct contrast to outbound marketing, which utilizes traditional interruptive marketing tactics such as direct mail, trade shows, print and TV advertising, and cold calling.

Instagram - Instagram is a photo sharing application that lets users take photos, apply filters to their images, and share the photos instantly on the Instagram network and other social networks like Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and Foursquare. The app is targeted toward mobile social sharing, and in just over one year, it has gained almost 15 million users. Currently, it is only available for iPhone devices.

Instant Messaging - Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time, direct text-based communication between two or more people. More advanced instant messaging software clients also allow enhanced modes of communication, such as live voice or video calling.

J

Joomla - Joomla is a content management system (CMS) that enables users to build websites and online applications.

K

Klout - Klout is a measure of social influence. The service allows users to connect various social accounts such as Facebook, Flickr, YouTube, etc., and then provides every user with his or her Klout score. The score is out of 100--the higher the score, the more inlfuence you have on the social world.

L

Lifecasting - Lifecasting is a continual broadcast of events in a person's life through digital media. Typically, lifecasting is transmitted through the internet and can involve wearable technology.

Like - A “Like” is an action that can be made by a Facebook user. Instead of writing a comment for a message or a status update, a Facebook user can click the "Like" button as a quick way to show approval and share the message.

Link Building - Link building is an aspect of search engine optimization in which website owners develop strategies to generate links to their site from other websites with the hopes of improving their search engine ranking. Blogging has emerged as a popular method of link building.

LinkedIn - LinkedIn is a business-oriented social networking site. Founded in December 2002 and launched in May 2003, it is mainly used for professional networking. As of June 2010, LinkedIn had more than 70 million registered users, spanning more than 200 countries and territories worldwide.

LinkedIn Today - LinkedIn Today is LinkedIn's own version of a social news service. Every industry on LinkedIn (marketing, journalism, technology, etc.) has its own LinkedIn Today. Stories are selected based off which ones are posted and shared the most by users of LinkedIn.

Lurker - A lurker online is a person who reads discussions on a message board, newsgroup, social network, or other interactive system, but rarely or never participates in the discussion.

M

Mashup - A content mashup contains multiple types of media drawn from pre-existing sources to create a new work. Digital mashups allow individuals or businesses to create new pieces of content by combining multiple online content sources.

Meme - A meme on the internet is used to describe a thought, idea, joke, or concept to be shared online. It is typically an image with text above and below it, but can also come in video and link form. A popular example is the "I Can Has Cheezburger?" cat meme that turned into an entire site of memes.

MySpace - MySpace is a social networking website owned by News Corporation. MySpace became the most popular social networking site in the United States in June 2006 and was overtaken internationally by its main competitor, Facebook, in April 2008.

Punchbowl - Punchbowl.com is a social site that facilitates party planning and provides members with ideas, invitations, favors, gift registries, photo/video sharing, and more.

N

News Feed - A news feed is literally a feed full of news. On Facebook, the News Feed is the homepage of users' accounts where they can see all the latest updates from their friends. The news feed on Twitter is called Timeline (not to get confused with Facebook's new look, also called Timeline).

O

Opera - Opera is an open-source web browser. While not as popular as Firefox, Opera is used as the default browser on some gaming systems and mobile devices.

Orkut - Orkut is a social networking website that is owned and operated by Google. The website is named after its creator, Google employee Orkut Büyükkökten. Although Orkut is less popular in the United States than competitors Facebook and MySpace, it is one of the most visited websites in India and Brazil.

P

Pandora - Pandora is a social online radio station that allows users to create stations based on their favorite artists and types of music.

Permalink - A permalink is an address or URL of a particular post within a blog or website.

Podcast - A podcast, or non-streamed webcast, is a series of digital media files, either audio or video, that are released episodically and often downloaded through an RSS feed.

Posterous - Posterous is a blogging and content syndication platform that allows users to post content from any computer or mobile device by sending an e-mail.

PostRank - PostRank monitors and collects social engagement related to content around the web. Essentially it helps publishers understand which type of content promotes sharing on the social web.

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Qik - Qik is an online video streaming service that lets users stream video live from their mobile phones to the web.

Quantcast - Quantcast provides website traffic and demographics for websites. The tool is primarily used by online advertisers looking to target specific demographics.

R

Real-Time Search - Real-time search is the method of indexing content being published online into search engine results with virtually no delay.

Reddit - Reddit is similar to Digg. It is a social news site that is built upon a community of users who share and comment on stories.

Retweet - A retweet is when someone on Twitter sees your message and decides to re-share it with his/her followers. A retweet button allows them to quickly resend the message with attribution to the original sharer's name.

RSS Feed - RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is a family of  web feed formats used to publish frequently updated content such as blogs and videos in a standardized format. Content publishers can syndicate a feed, which allows users to subscribe to the content and read it when they please, and from a location other than the website (such as reader services like Google Reader).

RSS Reader - An RSS reader allows users to aggregate articles from multiple websites into one place using RSS feeds. The purpose of these aggregators is to allow for a faster and more efficient consumption of information. An example of an RSS Reader is Google Reader.

S

Scribd - Scribd turns document formats such as PDF, Word, and PowerPoint into a web document for viewing and sharing online.

Search Engine Optimization - Search engine optimization is the process of improving the volume or quality of traffic to a website from search engines via unpaid or organic search traffic.

Second Life - Second Life is an online virtual world developed by Linden Lab that was launched on June 23, 2003. Users are called "residents," and they interact with each other through avatars. Residents can explore, meet other residents, socialize, participate in individual and group activities, create and trade virtual property and services with one another, and travel throughout the world.

Seesmic - Seesmic is a popular desktop and mobile social application. Using APIs, Seesmic allows users to share content on social networks such as Twitter and Google Buzz from the same application.

Sentiment - Sentiment is normally referred to as the attitude of user comments related to a brand online. Some social media monitoring tools measure sentiment.

SlideShare - SlideShare is an online social network for sharing presentations and documents. Users can favorite and embed presentations as well as share them on other social networks such as Twitter and Facebook.

Skype - Skype is a free program that allows for text, audio, and video chats between users. Additionally, users can purchase plans to receive phone calls through their Skype account.

Social Media - Social media is media designed to be disseminated through social interaction, created using highly accessible and scalable publishing techniques.

Social Media Monitoring - Social media monitoring is a process of monitoring and responding to mentions related to a business that occur in social media.

StumbleUpon - StumbleUpon is a free web-browser extension that acts as an intelligent browsing tool for discovering and sharing web sites.

T

Tag Cloud - A tag cloud is a visual depiction of user-generated tags, or simply the word content of a site, typically used to describe the content of web sites.

Technorati - Technorati is a popular blog search engine that also provides categories and authority rankings for blogs.

Timeline - Timeline is the new Facebook form

Source: Hubspot

Jun 12, 2014

What is Mobile Marketing? How does Mobile Marketing work?


I would tell you that mobile is the future of marketing, but really the era of mobile has already arrived. If you're not implementing some kind of mobile marketing strategy, you're already trailing behind! As you can see from the graph below, more users are spending larger amounts of time engaged with mobile devices than ever before. We can expect this trend to continue even further in the future, so get ready!
marketing for mobile

How Does Mobile Marketing Work?

Mobile marketing consists of ads that appear on mobile smartphones, tablets, or other mobile devices. Mobile marketing ad formats, customization, and styles can vary, as many social media platforms, websites, and mobile apps offer their own unique and tailored mobile ad options.

Why You Need A Mobile Marketing Strategy

Your business needs a mobile marketing strategy for the same reason that you need a computer and wi-fi access – this is the age in which we live! Walk around any major city and you’ll find more than just a few folks with faces glued to their smartphone screens. According to recent reports, 40% of users’ internet time is spent on mobile devices, which means simply ignoring the rise of mobile just isn’t an option.
Some other interesting mobile marketing statistics:
80% of mobile device time in spent on apps, with game apps eating up the largest percent of app time
- People browse 70% more web pages on tablets than smartphones
- Retail conversion rates are 2.2% on tablets, considerably higher than 0.7% on smartphones, but traditional PC conversion rates are still highest at 3.3%
- Mobile searches have increased 200% year over year in 2012
- Mobile is predicted to surpass desktop in 2014
Mobile is here to stay, and if forecasts are correct, it will soon by eclipsing desktop usage. If you don’t have a mobile marketing strategy yet, it’s time to get going!
Grade Your Mobile PPC

Types Of Mobile Marketing Strategies

There’s a healthy variety of mobile marketing strategies to try. The kind that works best for your business will depend on your industry, target audience, and budget.
App-based marketing: This is mobile advertising involving mobile apps. While 80% of mobile time is spent engaged with apps, you don’t have to create an app yourself to get in on the action. Services likeGoogle AdMob help advertisers create mobile ads that appear within third-party mobile apps.
Facebook also allows advertisers to create ads that are integrated into Facebook’s mobile app. Facebook’s mobile Promoted Post ads integrate so seamlessly with Facebook’s news feed that users often don’t realize they’re looking at ads.
In-game mobile marketing: In-game mobile marketing refers to mobile ads that appear within mobile games, like in the example below. In-game ads can appear as banner pop-ups, full-page image ads or even video ads that appear between loading screens.
in game mobile marketing
QR codes: QR codes are scanned by users, who are then taken to a specific webpage that the QR code is attached to. QR codes are often aligned with mobile gamification and have an element of mystery to them, since users who scan them don’t always know exactly which rabbit hole they’re jumping down.
Location-based marketing: Location-based mobile ads are ads that appear on mobile devices based upon a user’s location relative to a specific area or business. For example, some advertisers may only want their mobile ads to appear when users are within a 1-mile radius of their business.
Mobile search ads: These are basic Google search ads built for mobile, often featuring extra add-on extensions like click-to-call or maps.
Mobile image ads: Image-based ads designed to appear on mobile devices.
SMS: SMS marketing involves capturing a user’s phone number and sending them text offers. This is considered somewhat passé. 

Mobile Marketing: Google AdWords Enhanced Campaigns

On July 12, Google rolled out Enhanced Campaigns for all AdWords users, integrating mobile advertising options with classic online AdWords advertising.
Enhanced Campaigns allow advertisers to manage their AdWords bids across various devices in one single campaign, rather than make separate campaigns for mobile vs. desktop. AdWords advertisers can simply take the Google search ads they already use, and then set bids to adjust for mobile devices. To increase bids for mobile devices, users can set a positive bid adjustment, such as +20%, and vice versa – a bid adjustment of -10% reduces the bid by 10% for mobile devices.
mobile bid adjustments
Picture borrowed from siteproppc.com
It’s in Google’s best interest to make mobile marketing easy for advertisers – Google generates a hefty amount of revenue from mobile ads.  
Google’s Enhanced Campaigns allow for advertisers to manage bids across devices, locations, and time with ease. Some advertisers may choose to bid higher for users on mobile devices who are within a certain range of their store, or may only want to bid on mobile devices during their store’s open hours, and Enhanced Campaigns make that an easy possibility for advertisers.

Google Mobile Ad Extensions

Creating mobile search ads with Google also lets you take advantage of Google’s nifty mobile ad extensions, which include features like:
Mobile Site Links: Mobile site links make it easy for mobile users to jump to specific pages of your site without wandering around. Site links are especially useful in mobile marketing, as it’s much more convenient for users on mobile devices.
What is mobile advertising?
Click-to-Call Mobile Ad Extension: The click-to-call extension puts a “call” button directly beneath an ad. Clicking the button automatically generates a business’s phone number on a user’s mobile device.
While this handy ad extension makes it easy for searchers to get in contact with your business and drives users down the conversion funnel, it’s best to only have the click-to-call mobile ad extension appear when your business is open and able to answer the phone.
Click to Call Mobile Marketing
Google Offers for Mobile: The Google Offers mobile ad extension lets advertisers post a discount offer or coupon beneath their ad. These special offers can capture the attention of users who might otherwise ignore an ad.
mobile marketing trends
Click-to-Download Ad Extension: The click-to-download ad extension is similar to the click-to-call, only instead of generating a phone number, clicking the “download” button takes users to the download page of the advertiser’s pre-selected app.
what is mobile marketing?
Local Ad Extensions: Local ad extensions are probably the most important extensions for mobile, considering that 1 in 3 mobile searches have local intent. Considering how many mobile searches are questions looking for a local solution, local mobile marketing needs to be a key aspect of your mobile strategy.
Local mobile marketing extensions often involve a phone number or link to Google Maps.
local mobile marketing

Mobile Marketing Best Practices

We’re leaving you with some quick mobile marketing tips to make sure you make the most of mobile.
Be Clear and Concise: Mobile devices have small screens, which means words should be used sparingly. Cluttered and crowded ads will just drive users to scroll past. When it comes to mobile, it’s best to keep things simple.
Optimize for Local: Be sure to remember that 1 in 3 mobile searches have local intent. Users often use mobile devices to complement their immediate worldly interactions – where is the nearest gas station? Is there a nearby coffee shop that has wi-fi? Optimize for local mobile marketing to make sure you are aligning with users’ queries.
Consider Your Audience: The type of audience you’re hoping to reach should influence the kind of mobile ads you use. Are they gamers? Then try taking advantage of in-game ads. Are they young and tech-savvy? Mobile Facebook Promoted Posts might be more likely to get their attention.
Experiment with Different Strategies: There’s a lot of room for experimentation when it comes to mobile marketing. Don’t be afraid to test out some ad extensions with your AdWords Enhanced Campaigns – try the Google Offers ad extension, or the click-to-call extension, and see how they work for you.
Benchmark Your Results: Experimenting is great, but there’s no point in trying new techniques if you’re not tracking your results to see what works and what doesn’t. Try the AdWords Grader to see how your mobile PPC ads are performing.

Jun 9, 2014

SEO: Everything you need to know NOW ! (Part 1)


*Part 1*

When you've been writing about SEO as long as I have you sometimes feel that you've run out of things to say. We forget that there is always someone new just learning about SEO and hasn't had the chance to read every article ever written on the topic. Not many people have that kind of time on their hands.

In light of that, I wanted to spend some time going back to the basics of SEO.

I recently was invited to speak to a group of beauty bloggers being hosted by L'Oreal in New York City. Most of the attendees write their own blogs or were responsible for the blogs for the company they work for. A good share of them also sold products through their blogs. Many of the illustrations I'll use in this series will be directed toward that audience, however they can be applied across the board to any industry, including those selling products or services.

The trick with going back to the basics is deciding what gets included and what doesn't. I'm sure there will be a lot of "basics" left out while some of the things noted here could be considered more advanced. Either way, the SEO information I'll provide here are those things which I consider essential. And perhaps that's a better way to look at this, not as SEO 101 but rather, SEO Essentials. Hopefully, whether you've been around a while or just learning about this stuff, you'll learn something new, have previous misconceptions expelled, or other thoughts confirmed.

Every site has to start somewhere. When it comes to people we've heard it said that beauty is on the inside. The same is often true of websites. The design of the site may be pretty and eye-appealing on the outside while the SEO elements are something a bit more creepifying. With a little work you can turn any SEO-ugly website into a gorgeous web marketing goddess.

But the point is, you have to start somewhere. Short of moving forward with the implementation of a good SEO strategy your site will be falling short in a number of different ways.

There are four basic benefits of SEO that are the foundation of the online success that it brings. In the end, what we are all looking for is more business. But in order to get that there are a few things that need to be dealt with as part of your optimization strategy.

Four basic benefits of SEO

An SEO Makeover Gets You NoticedBefore you can get your pages to rank for your targeted keyword phrases, you need to be sure that the search engines can first find them, and second decipher them. This goes back to making sure that you have a strong, search engine friendly website architecture. You do this by ensuring your links are properly navigable. The navigation of your site must have a properly established hierarchy, and your content needs to be readable. I'll touch on these things in more detail later in the series.

Rankings

This is what we all want SEO for, right? Actually, I hope not. We'll discuss the other two benefits which are far more important next, but while rankings are an important part of SEO, they are not the goal in and of themselves. Too many people look at rankings and think "I'm losing x amount of business because I'm not ranked #1. This may or may not be true. Different rankings produce different bounce rates. It's important to understand that rankings don't make sales, they just provide a way in the door, and those that come in at #1 may not be as ready to buy as those that come in at #5.

Visitors

Once you start getting rankings, even for low-volume but important keywords, you'll start to see your visitor count rise. Again, this is good, but not the ultimate goal you're trying to achieve unless you get paid on a cost per impression basis.

Conversions

This is the big goal. The end-all, be-all purpose of search engine optimization. SEO is more than just helping you get rankings and drive traffic to your site. It should also help you increase your conversion counts and percentages. A conversion can be anything you want it to be; a comment on your blog, a download of a white paper, a follow on twitter, or a purchase of a product. Its important to know what your conversions are so you can set your optimization goals to help achieve them.

Search engines are stoopid

Throughout the process of SEO it's important to keep in mind that the search engines, as smart and advanced as they are, are still pretty stupid. They can't tell the intent, so if intent is needed in order to determine relevance of a page or keyword, the search engines are unaware. Part of the SEO process is going out of your way to spell things out to the search engines so no guessing is needed.

Keep in mind visitors can also be pretty dumb themselves. Business owners are always complaining about calls they get asking for information that's clearly noted in the website. Of course, it's not that your visitors are really stupid, it's that they are impatient for things that are not easy. The harder your site is to navigate, find information, make a purchase or get that conversion, the more likely the visitor is to leave. They'll move on to another site where things are easy.

As we go through this SEO process we'll be looking at things that make your site easier to understand, navigate and process for both the search engines and the visitors. And while much of this information is "basic", it's these basics that still matter to the search engines.

SEO: Everything you need to know NOW !

Source: SearchEngineGuide, KillerInfographics